Muskgrass

Muskgrass (Chara sp.) can be finicky in growth cycles, seeing boom and bust years. When in a “boom” year, muskgrass will likely be one of the first species to begin growing. Try a rattle-trap, big swim bait, or Carolina rig through this brittle charophyte.

Seasonal Techniques

Spring—Muskgrass can be finicky in growth cycles, seeing boom and bust years. When in a “boom” year, muskgrass will likely be one of the first species to begin growing. Try a rattle-trap, big swim bait, or Carolina rig through this brittle charophyte.

Summer—Unlike other submersed aquatic plants, muskgrass may not top out during the summer months. While other submersed species may offer only punching, muskgrass can be easily fished with swimbaits and other weedless presentations.

Fall—Competition for space with invasives will often leave muskgrass confined to shallow depths and areas void of other species. Look for muskgrass patches among other species and fish them while other plants are still actively growing and hard to fish.

Winter—Muskgrass will often die completely back so no need in targeting this species during winter. 

Habitat Value

Fish—Muskgrass provides valuable habitat for invertebrates and other species on which predatory fish feed. This species also provides habitat for juvenile fish.

Waterfowl—Waterfowl extensively use muskgrass as a food source.

Identifying Features

What It Looks Like—When held in hand, the plant is said to have a rough or crunchy feel. As it gets its name, muskgrass is easily identified by its foul odor, often said to smell like garlic or onion. 

Max Depth—6 feet

Where to Find It—Muskgrass can be found in a wide variety of places. In areas where invasives like hydrilla and milfoil aren’t present, this plant dominates. Look in shallow, calm water areas.

Similar Species—Muskgrass can resemble coontail, however the foul odor of muskgrass is often a tell-tale giveaway.

Drawbacks

Muskgrass impacts water use in some areas. Cost to manage: $$ out of $$$$$.