Canadian Elodea

Emerging in early spring from overwintering buds, tender Canadian elodea (Elodea canadensis) sprouts are perfect to target with a rattle-trap. Though it's not as aggressive as other plants, Canadian elodea provides a transition zone that should not be overlooked.

Seasonal Techniques

Spring—Emerging in early spring from overwintering buds, tender Canadian elodea sprouts are perfect to target with a rattle-trap. While other plants around it are beginning to grow aggressively, Canadian elodea provides a transition zone that should not be overlooked.

Summer—Like most other plants, growth will increase during summer. Canadian elodea growth may be less noticed in southeastern reservoirs as other plants dominate. Being much more “whimpy” than other species, punching and ripping through Canadian elodea is much easier to accomplish than through similar species like hydrilla and Brazilian elodea.

Fall—Canadian elodea will often be some of the first perennial species to begin to die back. Look for holes back in behind thick stands of hydrilla where the canopy has opened up.  

Winter—Canadian elodea will die back and rarely leave much to stick around during winter.

Habitat Value

Fish—Provides good habitat and safety structure for fry and juvenile sport fish, as well as a refuge for baitfish.

Waterfowl—Can provide key food for waterfowl, however occurrence of Canadian elodea in the Tennessee Valley makes its impact minimal.

Identifying Features

What It Looks Like—Smaller, pointed leaves whorled around the stem, most often in sets of the three.

Where to Find It—In TVA reservoirs, Canadian elodea can be hard to find. Look for cool water springs and blue holes in the backs of creeks.

Max Depth—0 to 5 feet

Similar Species—Canadian elodea resembles Brazilian elodea and hydrilla. All of them have leaves in whorls around the stem. However, Canadian elodea has three leaves per whorl, whereas hydrilla and Brazilian elodea almost always have more than three leaves per whorl.

Drawbacks

As a native species, Canadian elodea very rarely becomes a problem in TVA reservoirs. Cost to manage: $ out of $$$$$.